Posts Tagged ‘Islam’

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Muslims advertise, too

November 28, 2007

The Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) has run a recent advertising campaign “designed to foster greater understanding of Islam and to counter a rising tide of anti-Muslim rhetoric in the United States.” The ads were supposed to number 52 in the series, but their Web site shows only about 6 or 7 of these. The photo below is just a part of the ad. Click here to see the full ad. Please comment on whether or not this ad changes your previous conception about Muslims, and if it does, in what way? What was your conception before and what is it now?

Muslim Girl Scout Troop Ad

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In the 50s, Americans went to church regularly

November 20, 2007

Praying Hands Billboard

This is a billboard that ran in the 1950s. It was designed pro bono by the Advertising Council. I’m just curious…was this a more appropriate message for the 50s than for today or would this work today?

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Hello world!

November 19, 2007

Welcome to Godvertising.wordpress.com. I invite you to become a part of a new dialogue, a new discussion that may lead to a better understanding of our unique American brand of observable manifestations of faith, discipleship, and piety—simply put, godvertising.

If you have ever seen a metallic fish decal affixed to the rear of a vehicle, a billboard exhorting attendance at church, a T-shirt sporting a special take on a verse or concept from the bible, a sign in front of a church proclaiming a humorous or inspirational message, a television commercial in which a large group of African-Americans breaks into a rousing, hand-clapping, gospel rendition of “Zoom, Zoom, Zoom” in celebration of Mazda’s latest Motor Trend award, or a print ad audaciously announcing the resurrection of a 25-year-old athletic shoe as the “Second Coming,” then you have witnessed godvertising in action. And in the process, perhaps, someone has “witnessed” to you.

Please submit examples of godvertising and/or comment on others’ uploads or comments. What offends you? How does godvertising work to evangelize? Does it put more people into pews—in churches, synagogues, temples, or mosques? Does the consumer product appropriation of religious imagery demean religious faith or does it reinforce it? Does the proliferation of religious imagery signify greater religiosity or not? How do religions compete with each other in their messages in ads, on billboards, on television, on the ‘Net, or on the radio? How are some denominations branding themselves? How do religious themes in our advertising media encroach upon the domain of civil religion or vice versa? What is the place of religion in politics? Where is it all leading?
Let’s hear from you on any aspect of this discussion. Suggest categories! Suggest ways to make this discussion better.