Posts Tagged ‘godvertising’

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God wants your change

December 17, 2007

Church SignMany church signs use double entendre to get their messages across. Do you like this message? Why or why not?

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It’s a hyphenated, caffeinated world

December 17, 2007

Blue Awning over ChurchI don’t think this was the name of the church congregation, but a descriptor of it. Anyone out there know for sure? I have to hand it to them…most people would have inadvertently omitted the hyphens. I congratulate them on their excellent grammar. If you care to see a larger version, here it is.

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Little Miss Sunbeam

December 3, 2007

Little Miss SunbeamHere’s one of America’s favorite brand images, Little Miss Sunbeam. Sunbeam White Bread was first marketed in Philadelphia, PA in 1942, and began to be baked all over the U.S. after the end of World War II. The billboard (LARGE VERSION) just went up this week in Urbana, IL in anticipation of Christmas. The art looks amazingly reminiscent of the 40s, and may be an exact replica of an actual billboard from those days. Ellen Segner originated the image of Little Miss Sunbeam, and according to the Web site of home company Quality Bakers of America, the artist produced more than 30 paintings of her for corporate advertising. Although not explicitly denominational, the theme is definitely Christian, with its large, bright star in the sky connoting the birth of Jesus. The text couldn’t be any more appropriate for a bread company.

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Here’s a clever idea for spreading the Gospel

November 29, 2007

Gospel in a CookieI’ve heard that this fortune cookie with a verse from the Bible has been around for quite some time. I just discovered it…or rather a whole bag of them…several months ago. The verses are from both the Old and New Testaments. Not only do restaurants use them, but I’ve heard of individuals who serve them at parties. For a larger version of the cookie and message, click this link.

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Broken church sign

November 21, 2007

signbrokensermoninside.jpg

This is an interesting twist on the church-sign sermon. You can’t simply drive by the church to catch the abbreviated version of the sermon. If you want the wisdom, you have to come in. I like it.

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Is Jennifer O’Neill a Sinner?

November 19, 2007

mysinad1972.jpgHere’s an example to get the discussion going. Jennifer O’Neill posed for this ad in 1972. The headline is a play on words, alluding to users of My Sin cologne being “Sinners.” If you look closely, Ms. O’Neill is nude under her velvet jacket. On her Web site, she states that about 14 or 15 years later, she was saved, and began her own evangelistic ministry mostly by writing books. How does this ad square with what she is doing these days? Is this type of ad off limits for an evangelical Protestant? Is there any reason why Ms. O’Neill should be embarrassed by this ad? Would this ad be likely to increase sales of My Sin cologne?

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Hello world!

November 19, 2007

Welcome to Godvertising.wordpress.com. I invite you to become a part of a new dialogue, a new discussion that may lead to a better understanding of our unique American brand of observable manifestations of faith, discipleship, and piety—simply put, godvertising.

If you have ever seen a metallic fish decal affixed to the rear of a vehicle, a billboard exhorting attendance at church, a T-shirt sporting a special take on a verse or concept from the bible, a sign in front of a church proclaiming a humorous or inspirational message, a television commercial in which a large group of African-Americans breaks into a rousing, hand-clapping, gospel rendition of “Zoom, Zoom, Zoom” in celebration of Mazda’s latest Motor Trend award, or a print ad audaciously announcing the resurrection of a 25-year-old athletic shoe as the “Second Coming,” then you have witnessed godvertising in action. And in the process, perhaps, someone has “witnessed” to you.

Please submit examples of godvertising and/or comment on others’ uploads or comments. What offends you? How does godvertising work to evangelize? Does it put more people into pews—in churches, synagogues, temples, or mosques? Does the consumer product appropriation of religious imagery demean religious faith or does it reinforce it? Does the proliferation of religious imagery signify greater religiosity or not? How do religions compete with each other in their messages in ads, on billboards, on television, on the ‘Net, or on the radio? How are some denominations branding themselves? How do religious themes in our advertising media encroach upon the domain of civil religion or vice versa? What is the place of religion in politics? Where is it all leading?
Let’s hear from you on any aspect of this discussion. Suggest categories! Suggest ways to make this discussion better.