Posts Tagged ‘Christianity’

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God wants your change

December 17, 2007

Church SignMany church signs use double entendre to get their messages across. Do you like this message? Why or why not?

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Drive a Vespa—no social stigma attached

December 12, 2007

Vespa PriestsThis is a great one that goes all the way back to 1965! Three real priests from Glendale, Ohio got around town on their scooters. Says the Vespa ad: “You could hardly call them wild ones. But you could say that they’re wildly practical.” Nobody will get the wrong idea about you, and they certainly will not “scoot up and ask if you want to drag for beers.” In fact, you can drive a Vespa and “maintain your dignity.” Hmmm…Vespa, vespers. Click here to view the large version.

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The Xerox brothers 30 years ago

December 6, 2007

Xerox monkIn 1976, Xerox launched a unique and highly successful ad campaign for their duplicators. This “monk” appeared in many of them, and became the “face” of the campaign. These fellas appeared on T-shirts and other promotional items, too. The concept was absolutely inspired. See the full 2-page spread.

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No blessing in Italy for Red Bull commercial

December 6, 2007

Cbgrace alerted us to this “brew” haha. It seems that Red Bull drink was advertised in a TV commercial (seen here on YouTube) recently in a high-energy version of the nativity story that introduces a fourth wise man. According to a Reuters story, Father Marco Damanti from Sicily has convinced the company to pull its commercial from Italian television, denouncing the spot as disrespectful and blasphemous.

“The image of the sacred family has been represented in a sacrilegious way,” Father Damanti told Corriere della Sera. “Whatever the ironic intentions of Red Bull, the advert pokes fun at the nativity, and at Christian sensitivity.”

The priest also objected to the company’s slogan, “Red Bull gives you wings,” said by angels in the animated advert.

Take a look, and tell us what you think of it.

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Little Miss Sunbeam

December 3, 2007

Little Miss SunbeamHere’s one of America’s favorite brand images, Little Miss Sunbeam. Sunbeam White Bread was first marketed in Philadelphia, PA in 1942, and began to be baked all over the U.S. after the end of World War II. The billboard (LARGE VERSION) just went up this week in Urbana, IL in anticipation of Christmas. The art looks amazingly reminiscent of the 40s, and may be an exact replica of an actual billboard from those days. Ellen Segner originated the image of Little Miss Sunbeam, and according to the Web site of home company Quality Bakers of America, the artist produced more than 30 paintings of her for corporate advertising. Although not explicitly denominational, the theme is definitely Christian, with its large, bright star in the sky connoting the birth of Jesus. The text couldn’t be any more appropriate for a bread company.

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Here’s a clever idea for spreading the Gospel

November 29, 2007

Gospel in a CookieI’ve heard that this fortune cookie with a verse from the Bible has been around for quite some time. I just discovered it…or rather a whole bag of them…several months ago. The verses are from both the Old and New Testaments. Not only do restaurants use them, but I’ve heard of individuals who serve them at parties. For a larger version of the cookie and message, click this link.

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Statue of Liberation Through Christ

November 25, 2007

Statue of Liberation, MemphisOn Independence Day of 2006, the congregation of Memphis’s 12,000-member World Overcomers Outreach Ministries Church unveiled their version of the Statue of Liberty. Lady Liberty’s torch is replaced by a cross, and she holds the tablets of the Ten Commandments in her left arm and hand. “Jehovah” is inscribed on her crown. She is called the Statue of Liberation Through Christ, and stands 72 feet tall. The church’s pastor, Apostle Alton Williams, claims that the statue serves as a reminder to all that God is the foundation of our nation. Some people have said that there’s nothing wrong with the statue, especially in the Bible Belt. Some have complained that religion and the symbol of our country’s freedom have nothing to do with each other, and that this statue misconstrues the true meaning of the Statue of Liberty.

Pastor Williams has written a book titled, “The Meaning of the Statue of Liberation Through Christ: Reconnecting Patriotism with Christianity.” His church is predominantly black, and in another of his books, Williams says that the real Statue of Liberty, a gift from France, “was originally intended not to welcome immigrants but to celebrate the emancipation of slaves” (New York Times, 2006).

Dismissed by one man as a cheap publicity stunt, the monument was anything but cheap. The structure cost the church $260,000, and was erected on church property. Williams is quoted at the end of the article as saying, “This statue proves that Jesus Christ is Lord over America, he is Lord over Tennessee, he is Lord over Memphis.”

What does a symbol like this say to people of other religious faiths in America? Are you okay with taking an American icon and changing its appearance and meaning? Does this “work” as evangelism?